thefatoublog:

Re-posted from DynamicAfrica. One word = WORD.

Fambul dem, this is how we do….

(via black-culture)

“People get used to anything. The less you think about your oppression, the more your tolerance for it grows. After a while, people just think oppression is the normal state of things. But to become free, you have to be acutely aware of being a slave.”

― Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography (via florxdexrebeldiax)

this is what my Assata earrings say !

(via memoriasconsazon)

(via dynastylnoire)

museumsyndicate:

Frederick C. Branch, the first Black Marine. (1945) 

(via black-culture)

organicsomethings:

alldopeeverything:
“A Lot a Learning,” by Leroy Campbell.

(via dynastylnoire)

dynastylnoire:

curlynugrowth:

Loc Petals

I want to try this

dynastylnoire:

curlynugrowth:

Loc Petals

I want to try this

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Remembering African-American Victims Injured By Police Brutality In America

Rev. Earl Baldwin Jr. (Pennsylvania): Tased By Pittsburgh Police While Praying & Giving Last Respects For His Deceased Stepson In A Hospital, Survived The Taser Attack, Has Now Sued Pittsburgh In A Civil Rights Lawsuit Over The Tasing

Reverend Earl Baldwin Jr. of Pittsburgh filed a civil rights lawsuit against police after they allegedly restrained and tased him in a hospital emergency room. Baldwin claims he was trying to pay his last respects to his dead stepson when the incident occurred.

According to Baldwin, he was trying to pray for 23-year-old Mileek Grissom in the UPMC Mercy Hospital, when officers pulled him away and tased him. “I needed to tell him his family was going to be OK,” Baldwin explained to WPXI. “I was going to do everything I could to make sure they were OK.”

Video from a hospital camera shows a distraught Baldwin handcuffed and surrounded by several officers trying to pull him away from his son, and one of the officers shooting him in the back with a taser. Officers say Baldwin was interfering while doctors tried to revive Grissom, but a family attorney says Grissom was dead and not being treated at the time.

The police department has not issued a statement about the lawsuit, but UPMC refutes Baldwin’s claim. “Clearly this was a stressful situation and a tragic loss for this family,” it said. “However, the allegations about the circumstances are inaccurate.”

Tori Baldwin, Grissom’s mother, was denied entry into the hospital at the time.

Source: Carimah Townes for ThinkProgress

(via mrstealyourwifi)

beautifuleastafricanbrides:

Hawzien + Keith, a mellow culturally infused Ethiopian and American wedding ❤️

(via dynastylnoire)

thewitchescauldron:

Yemaya the Orisha of the 7 Seas, Motherhood and Childbirth of the Yoruba Religion

(via ohbrae)

“Though Mean Girls was rated PG-13 for “sexual content, language, and some teen partying,” that was a rating Paramount had to fight for, says Waters. “We had lots of battles with the ratings board on the movie. There was the line, ‘Amber D’Lessio gave a blow job to a hot dog,’ which eventually became ‘Amber D’Lessio made out with a hot dog.’ Which is somehow weirder! That’s the thing we found: When you’re trying to make a joke obey the rules and not use any bad words, it can actually become seamier, even.” Still, there were some things that Waters simply refused to change. “The line in the sand that I drew was the joke about the wide-set vagina. The ratings board said, ‘We can’t give you a PG-13 unless you cut that line.’ We ended up playing the card that the ratings board was sexist, because Anchorman had just come out, and Ron Burgundy had an erection in one scene, and that was PG-13. We told them, ‘You’re only saying this because it’s a girl, and she’s talking about a part of her anatomy. There’s no sexual context whatsoever, and to say this is restrictive to an audience of girls is demeaning to all women.’ And they eventually had to back down.””
— don’t fuck with tina fey (via brokenclocksrighttwiceaday)

(via this-iznt-our-parade)

kingpinnn:

Misty Copeland, “an unlikely ballerina,” who went from poverty to making history, as “only the second black woman in the history of the American Ballet Theatre to gain the status of soloist.”

(via black-culture)